Malta

2021 – A New Chapter for the European Movement Malta

2021 – A New Chapter for the European Movement Malta

We set up this web-page to serve as a platform for sharing ideas and analysis on the EU and Malta’s place in that Union. We are back after sitting in the background for some years as we pursued our aims and objectives in other less visible ways. After all, our relevance did not stop in 2004 when Malta joined the EU.

We are proud to recall that seventeen years of membership have benefitted our citizens in many ways, and events have proven us correct on the major issues of EU membership.

Although we played our part in the ‘great national debate’ that preceded membership, we never claimed victory which belonged to the people and to no other.

It is not our intention to dwell on history, but we draw satisfaction from the fact that those who denigrated us and our message in the past have come round to our way of thinking. We always sought national consensus on EU membership, and it has arrived, even if in a strange and awkward way.

The European Movement Malta is a non-profit, non-partisan, non-governmental organization (NGO). It owes allegiance to no political party. It forms part of civil society and wishes to cooperate with all NGOs which share its ideals.

At this juncture we wish to highlight some important developments in the European Union which are likely to draw our interest in the future both from a Maltese and a European Perspective.

We set up this web-page to serve as a platform for sharing ideas and analysis on the EU and Malta’s place in that Union. We are back after sitting in the background for some years as we pursued our aims and objectives in other less visible ways. After all, our relevance did not stop in 2004 when Malta joined the EU.

We are proud to recall that seventeen years of membership have benefitted our citizens in many ways, and events have proven us correct on the major issues of EU membership.

Although we played our part in the ‘great national debate’ that preceded membership, we never claimed victory which belonged to the people and to no other.

It is not our intention to dwell on history, but we draw satisfaction from the fact that those who denigrated us and our message in the past have come round to our way of thinking. We always sought national consensus on EU membership, and it has arrived, even if in a strange and awkward way.

The European Movement Malta is a non-profit, non-partisan, non-governmental organization (NGO). It owes allegiance to no political party. It forms part of civil society and wishes to cooperate with all NGOs which share its ideals.

At this juncture we wish to highlight some important developments in the European Union which are likely to draw our interest in the future both from a Maltese and a European Perspective.


Quality of Life and Rule of Law

From a national perspective, we argue that Malta needs to use all the resources it can obtain from the EU to strengthen the quality of life of its citizens and residents, and above all the rule of law. These were the primary objectives in the minds of those who voted for membership in 2003.

Stronger institutions free from partisan political meddling, the separation of powers, safeguards for ordinary citizens, the protection of public goods and property, true freedom for the agencies which oversee the proper application of regulatory standards for the benefit of all is the mark of a true republic.

Malta needs to look harder at the directions which national economic growth should take in the future, the obvious limitations of our physical territory, the strengths and resourcefulness of our citizens, the importance of a science and technologically based economy and question some of the paths that we have embarked on in the past in order to learn from our mistakes.

The touchstone of the improvement in the quality of life and welfare of our citizens, is the preservation of the social-market economy. Malta’s EU membership can be a source of light in all this effort.


The EU on the Path to Growth

The conclusion of the EU-UK Trade Agreement permits the EU to archive BREXIT and pigeon-hole the ongoing negotiations with the UK, while it busies itself with more challenging, existential matters such as restarting the European economy after COVID-19, a more resilient euro zone and ensuring a better quality of life for all European citizens. The EU needs also to stop internal backsliding on democratic practices.

There is the ambitious challenge to turn the EU into a carbon neutral economy by 2050. That goal can help improve the lives of many, make the EU more globally competitive and reduce its geopolitical risks of dependence on external energy sources.

The EU has several other challenges: Permanent Structured Cooperation in defence (PESCO), troubles in our immediate neighbourhood particularly in Libya but also in the Eastern part of Europe, relations with Washington, Iran’s nuclear ambitions and terrorism.

Well-managed migration is still elusive while further developments in the EU’s policy approach remain blocked.

Our country will be impacted by what happens in the EU, by its policy successes and failures, by intended and unintended consequences, unpredicted convulsions like the sudden appearance of COVID-19, by what the Maltese government decides to support and oppose in the European Council and the Council of the European Union, and by what our Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) do in that legislative assembly.

We invite citizens to dialogue on these life affecting matters.  

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